Amy-Jane Blackhall – Everyone is a Moon

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Everyone Is A Moon is an exhibition of new work by artist and printmaker Amy-Jane Blackhall that takes the form of an immersive sculptural installation.

Blackhall’s work emerges from her fascination with the concept of interconnectedness, through the physical and spiritual act of making, particularly the repetitive nature of print.

Underlying structures are central to her imagery; derived from sacred places, she frequently references archetypal symbols, Oriental art and Eastern ideologies. Recurring themes in her work reflect on how the universality has a strong aesthetic appeal transcending space and time, language and culture.

A large lunar abacus takes centre stage. A familiar childhood object used for counting now holds hand blown glass moons positioned to mark the lunar phases of 2017. Casting it’s own shadow and reflection in the mirror moon it exists beyond it’s framework; as the audience orbit the space they can’t help but interact and engage.

Accompanied by a series of prints made from solar plates there is an emphasis on the comfort in the cadence and repetition of ongoing cycles that both anchor and elude us.

Neil Bousfield & Nik Pollard – Coast

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Coast explores two artists response to the changing British Coastline and surrounding wetlands.

Neil Bousfield’s Home and Place and Walcott woodcut series reflect on notions of temporality, loss, and fragility. The prints begin to map and record the impact of the process of coastal erosion, storms, sea surges and rising sea levels on Walcott as a place. The delicate marks and pallet used act to unravel a narrative that explores a changing landscape and community.

Nik Pollards Wallasea drawings explore the relationship between landscape and nature. In 2015/16 Pollard was invited by the RSPB to help record the Wallasea Island Wild Coast Project though drawing and painting on site. The RSPB reserve in Essex is an ambitious project in which ancient wetland landscape is being recreated using, amongst other things, 4.5 million tonnes of spoil from the London Crossrail. It is part of a plan to combat flooding, the effects of climate change and to replace lost natural habitat. Saltmarsh, mudflats, lagoons and pasture are being established through major earthworks – the biggest conservation and engineering project of its type in Europe.

The energetic drawings are the result of two visits made to the site and reflect Pollards fascination for the contrast between the site under construction and its development as flora and fauna beginning to take hold.